Wednesday, November 29, 2023
HomeUSBiden and Xi Jinping meet to discuss U.S.-China relations

Biden and Xi Jinping meet to discuss U.S.-China relations

Biden-Xi summit concludes, White House says The White House said shortly before 3:30 p.m. PT that the Biden-Xi summit is over, according to a pool report. The summit lasted a little more than four hours. Share this –
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Biden gives thumbs-up and responds to question about the meeting As Biden and Xi walked by reporters, Biden gave a thumbs-up in response to shouted questions about the meeting. Asked how the talks are going, Biden said, “Well.” Share this –
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Biden and Xi emerge from working lunch meeting Biden and Xi walked together by reporters this afternoon after they had a working lunch meeting. In a little more than an hour, Biden is expected to hold a solo press conference. Share this –
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Biden tweets during summit: ‘We made real progress’ Biden tweeted that he and Xi “made real progress” during today’s summit, and emphasized the importance of understanding one another. “I value the conversation I had today with President Xi because I think it’s paramount that we understand each other clearly, leader to leader,” Biden said on X. “There are critical global challenges that demand our joint leadership. And today, we made real progress.” Share this –
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Diplomacy, with a side of ravioli The White House released the menu for the Biden-Xi working lunch: Herbed ricotta ravioli
Artichoke crisps
Tarragon roasted heritage chicken
Carolina gold rice pilaf
Charred broccolini and Brussels sprouts
Almond meringue cake
Praline buttercream
Concord grape sauce Share this –
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Biden and Xi have working lunch meeting Biden and Xi are participating in a working lunch meeting, according to a White House pool report. The meeting started shortly after 2 p.m. PT. Biden is attending the meeting with Blinken and Sullivan. Xi is attending the meeting with top officials Wang Yi and Cai Qi. Share this –
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Biden-Xi expanded meeting wraps up Biden and Xi’s expanded bilateral meeting ended at 1:35 p.m. PT, according to a pool report. Now, the two leaders will go into their next closed-door meetings, which will be a smaller group. The larger meeting appears to have lasted about two hours. Share this –
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Coming into today’s meeting, expectations were low. Share this –
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Couples that bilat together… Today’s meeting could be the first time a husband and wife are both at the table for a major U.S. bilat meeting. Lael Brainard, rirector of the National Economic Council (and former vice chair of the Federal Reserve) is sitting next to John Kerry. At the other end of the table is her husband, Kurt Campbell, currently National Security Council coordinator for the Indo-Pacific and who has been nominated to be deputy secretary of state. Share this –
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I was very struck by Xi’s opening comments referring to “respect” in connection with the right way for two countries to get along with each other. His comments that “it’s unrealistic for one country to remodel the other” would appear to be a reference to U.S. concerns about human rights abuses in China and other domestic policies. Share this –
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Here are the U.S. and Chinese participants The U.S. delegation includes: Antony Blinken, Secretary of State
Janet Yellen, Secretary of the Treasury
Gina Raimondo, Secretary of Commerce
Jake Sullivan, Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs Show more Lael Brainard, Assistant to the President and Director of the National Economic Council
John Kerry, Special Presidential Envoy for Climate
Kurt Campbell, Deputy Assistant to the President and Coordinator for the Indo-Pacific, National Security Council
Nicholas Burns, Ambassador of the United States to the People’s Republic of China
Daniel Kritenbrink, Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs
Sarah Beran, Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for China, National Security Council
Rush Doshi, Deputy Senior Director for China, National Security Council
Pierce Davis, Director for China, National Security Council The Chinese delegation includes: President Xi Jinping of the People’s Republic of China
Cai Qi, Member of the Standing Committee of the Political Bureau of the CCCPC, Director of the General Office of the CCCPC
Wang Yi, Member of the Political Bureau of the CCCPC, Minister of Foreign Affairs
Jiang Jinquan, Director of the Policy Research Office of the CCCPC
Zheng Shanjie, Chairman of the National Development and Reform Commission
Lan Fo’an, Minister of Finance
Wang Wentao, Minister of Commerce
Ma Zhaoxu, Vice Minister of Foreign Affairs
Xie Feng, Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China to the United States
Lu Luhua, Secretary of President Xi Jinping
H.E. Hua Chunying, Assistant Minister of Foreign Affairs
Yang Tao, Director-General, Department of North American and Oceanian Affairs, MFA
Zheng Liqiao, Deputy Director-General, Department of North American and Oceanian Affairs, MFA Share this –
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Biden-Xi summit begins Shortly after both leaders delivered opening remarks, the press was escorted out of the room for the meeting to start. Both leaders were flanked at a long table by a slew of top administration officials. President Joe Biden meets with Chinese President Xi Jinping during the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Leaders’ week in Woodside, Calif., on Wednesday. Brendan Smialowski / AFP – Getty Images Share this –
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Xi says ‘not an option’ for U.S. and China to turn their backs on each other Xi said in his remarks to Biden and the U.S. delegation that the world has changed since he last met with Biden in Bali a year ago. “The world has emerged from the Covid pandemic, but is still under its tremendous impacts. The global economy is recovering, but its momentum remains sluggish,” Xi said. The Chinese president said his country’s relationship with the U.S. has “never been smooth sailing” over the last 50 years “yet it has kept moving forward” with twists and turns. “It is unrealistic for one side to remodel the other, and conflict and confrontation has terrible consequences for both sides,” he said. “The world at large is big enough for the two countries to succeed.” Xi said he looks forward to exchanging views on various world issues during the summit. Share this –
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Biden delivers opening comments to Xi Biden delivered opening remarks to Xi before the summit in a portion of the meeting open to the press. He thanked Xi for coming to the U.S. and reflected on the leaders’ last meeting in Bali. Biden also emphasized that the leaders had to ensure that competition should not veer into conflict, which echoed remarks administration officials have delivered in the past over the countries’ relations. “I value our conversation because I think it’s paramount that you and I understand each other clearly, leader to leader, with no misconceptions or miscommunication,” Biden said. Share this –
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Biden and Xi shake hands Biden greeted Xi on the red carpet for the Chinese president’s arrival. The two leaders briefly shook hands before entering the building for the summit. President Joe Biden shakes hand with Chinese President Xi Jinping on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit, in Woodside, Calif., on Wednesday. Kevin Lamarque / Reuters Share this –
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Xi arrives at the summit Xi arrived at the meeting in Woodside, California, and was greeted at the door by Biden. U.S. military members flanked a red carpet at the entrance, with a U.S. flag on one side and a Chinese flag on the other. The summit marks the first bilateral meeting between the two leaders in a year. Share this –
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Biden has arrived at the summit Biden arrived at the meeting site, Filoli Historic House and Garden, in Woodside, Calif., at 1:51 p.m. ET. Share this –
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Who’s in the motorcade heading to the summit? Officials from the White House are officially en route to the meeting with Xi, including: Secretary Antony Blinken, Department of State Secretary Janet Yellen, Department of the Treasury Secretary Gina Raimondo, Department of Commerce Jake Sullivan, Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs Show more Nicholas Burns, Ambassador of the United States to the People’s Republic of China Jen O’Malley Dillon, Assistant to the President & Deputy Chief of Staff Mike Donilon, Assistant to the President & Senior Advisor to the President Annie Tomasini, Assistant to the President & Senior Adviser to the President & Director of Oval Office Operations Karine Jean-Pierre, Assistant to the President & Press Secretary Ben LaBolt, Assistant to the President & Director of Communications Lael Brainard, Assistant to the President & Director of the National Economic Council Ryan Montoya, Assistant to the President & Director of Scheduling & Advance Kurt Campbell, Deputy Assistant to the President and NSC Coordinator for the Indo-Pacific Curtis Ried, Deputy Assistant to the President & NSC Chief of Staff & Executive Secretary John Kirby, Deputy Assistant to the President & NSC Coordinator for Strategic Communications Adrienne Watson, Special Assistant to the President & Senior Director for Press & NSC Spokesperson Carlyn Reichel, Special Assistant to the President & Senior Director for Speechwriting & Strategic Initiatives, National Security Council Sarah Beran, Special Assistant to the President and NSC Senior Director for China and Taiwan Affairs Charlie Fromstein, Director for Visits and Diplomatic Affairs, National Security Council Ariana Berengaut, Senior Adviser to the National Security Adviser Share this –
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Biden heads to APEC Summit Biden is headed to the summit site in Woodside, Calif., at the Filoli Historic House and Garden. He’s scheduled to arrive at approximately 10:47 a.m. PT. Share this –
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DeSantis writes China policy op-ed Presidential candidate Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis — who has framed China as the United States’ top national security threat in both policy and rhetoric — is out with an op-ed today published in the New York Post outlining his China-focused foreign policy plans. Both US parties have mistakenly treated China as a friendly competitor, letting a hostile Marxist regime exploit our openness and steal our technology, jobs, industries and assets through trade abuses, currency manipulation and slave labor. It’s allowed Beijing’s defense budget and military to rival Washington’s, putting China on track to surpass us economically.” “While adversaries such as Russia, Iran and North Korea threaten America and must be countered, China is our foremost national-security threat. When you examine the conflict between Ukraine and Russia, who is Russia’s main backer? China. If you look at what’s happening in Gaza with Hamas, much of the terrorism is funded by Iran, whose regime is ultimately funded through black-market oil sales to China. And China supports and protects the totalitarian regime in North Korea. We must address China’s behavior to counter these other threats effectively.” “I will posture ground-based missiles with allies in the Indo-Pacific as a ‘ring of fire’ to deter China’s aggression and invest in ports in the region to ensure free and fair access to the seas.” Share this –
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Biden and Xi meet in effort to smooth tensions SAN FRANCISCO — Biden will meet face-to-face with his Chinese counterpart today, breaking a yearlong silence marked by rising tensions that have stoked fears their countries are on a path toward war. The summit will take place in San Francisco this morning at a location U.S. officials declined to reveal out of security concerns. It will be the first time that Biden and Xi have talked — much less met — since a meeting on the sidelines of an international summit in Bali, Indonesia, a year ago. Since that time, relations between the U.S. and China have soured in ways that elevate the risk of an unwanted confrontation, U.S. officials said. As an example, when the Biden administration shot down a Chinese spy balloon that crossed the U.S. in February, the Pentagon had no one in China to contact because Beijing had closed an important military communications channel, a senior Biden administration official told reporters yesterday while previewing the Biden-Xi meeting. Read the full story here. Share this –
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Report casts doubt on U.S.-China diplomacy The newly released annual report by the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission includes a sobering assessment of the state of U.S.-China relations and suggests the futility — in the minds of the commissioners and staff — of high-level diplomacy like the meeting between Biden and Xi today. “While the top-level contacts reflected a general desire, at least by the United States, to improve the relationship with Beijing and create an air of normalcy, the new normal is one of continuing, long-term strategic and systemic competition,” the report’s executive summary begins. “China’s Communist Party (CCP) regime gives no sign of altering its policies, either at home or abroad. Beijing continues to reject cooperation with the United States on fundamental questions of national security, economics, or trade.” “The result of high-level meetings between the United States and China has been merely the promise of further meetings — that is, of more talk rather than concrete actions. China now appears to view diplomacy with the United States primarily as a tool for forestalling and delaying U.S. pressure over a period of years while China moves ever further down the path of developing its own economic, military, and technological capabilities.” The report includes a blunt assessment of China’s influence operations in the U.S. and around the world, saying they “seek to undermine political processes and manipulate political or social activity to disguise actions that advance China’s interests as being the efforts of domestic constituencies.” “Under Xi’s rule, China’s overseas influence activities are now more prevalent, institutionalized, technologically sophisticated, and aggressive than under his predecessors,” the report adds. “The Chinese Party-state exhibits a growing and increasingly brazen tendency to employ coercion in tandem with persuasion to conduct overseas influence activities, often in ways that challenge other countries’ sovereignty or threaten the rights of persons living within their borders,” the report continues. “Beijing seeks to sow discord in other countries, including the United States, where the uptick in China’s influence activities has inflamed rhetoric and contributed to a troubling rise in violence against Asian Americans.” Share this –
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Biden and Xi are set for a high-stakes meeting in California to stabilize a relationship that’s reached its lowest point in decades. NBC’s Peter Alexander reports for “TODAY.” Share this –
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